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About Me

I’m a travel writer, trip director, communications specialist, and diversity trainer who is passionate about the intersection of social justice and technology.

My appreciation for gender empowerment stems from graduating from Wellesley College, where women’s aspirations and accomplishments were valued. I’ve studied in France and I’ve taught in public schools in Boston and San Antonio.

In 2016, I finished 27 months of service with the Peace Corps in Nicaragua, where I worked as an LGBT diversity trainer, social media manager, TEFL teacher trainer, and fundraised thousands of dollars for gender empowerment camps. Now, you might see me giving bike tours on the National Mall with DC Bike and Roll!

I’ve coordinated social media for  Wanderful, a women’s travel startup, and I’m currently a Visit.org storytelling ambassador, and I’ve written about travel, LGBTQ issues, mental health, and women’s empowerment for Go Abroad and Travel Latina. Here’s my writing portfolio. I’m also translating 11,000+ words of the Babyscripts mobile healthcare application to Spanish to reach a wider audience of Latina mothers.

I do translation work, editing, research, and social media consulting consistently and quickly. Whenever I work, I make sure everything I post goes the distance. I know the value of consistency, communication, and creativity. Everyone has a story to tell. Not only will I help you tell your story, I’ll make sure it is heard.

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Self-Esteem, Straight Up: Confessions of a Nicaraguan College Student

Self-Esteem, Straight Up: Confessions of a Nicaraguan College Student

I met Romy two years ago when I was helping out in an ACCESS English class. ACCESS is a micro scholarship program that prepares high schoolers to learn English. Romy is now in her first year of college and she works at a coffee shop to pay the bills. She’s an incredibly intelligent, kind young woman who also speaks better English than most Nicaraguans I’ve ever met.

One day, I stopped by the coffee shop for breakfast and Romy and I ended up chatting about self-esteem, which is a topic that I didn’t think would be of such interest to people until I came to Nicaragua. Find out what it’s like to for a young woman to navigate societal pressures, and learn from the advice she gives about avoiding toxic relationships.

Char: So, after you saw my blog post about my Japanese painting, you told me you wanted to blog about self-esteem. Why is self-esteem so important to you?

Romy: I’ve talked to lots of girls about this, and it’s a huge issue. It’s about seeing both your flaws and qualities and accepting yourself. It’s about how you show yourself to the world. If you have low self-self esteem, then people will see you in a negative light. Your self-esteem is the first thing people notice about you.

Char: When I first came to Nicaragua, I asked my youth group to choose a workshop topic. Out of all the topics, like HIV/AIDS prevention and goal setting, they chose self-esteem. I had no idea it was so important to people here. What affects self-esteem?

Romy: What your family thinks of you. You might have trouble at home and your family members might be affecting you in negative ways, but you might not talk about it with them. Negative people are often unaware of how they make others feel powerless. You have to know that it’s not your fault, and that you can’t solve everyone’s problems.

Not everyone tells me I’m “smart” and “mature” as you do, Char. Sometimes I’m around people who make me feel like I’m not enough, and that lowers my self-esteem.

Char: A lot of people gain self-esteem from other people. Do you agree with this? Continue reading “Self-Esteem, Straight Up: Confessions of a Nicaraguan College Student”

That Time We Spoke About Street Harassment on the Nicaraguan Radio

That Time We Spoke About Street Harassment on the Nicaraguan Radio

Last week, I walked to the Women’s Collective of Matagalpa, which I’ve been to multiple times for their spontaneous theater shows. The collective has a theater program, health and education outreach, and a radio station.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness month. April 10-16 is International Anti-Street Harassment Week, so I thought I’d see if the collective was having an event to raise awareness. I’d just written about kick-ass organizations in Egypt, Mexico, the U.S., and India fighting against street harassment, so I thought I’d ask.

I asked Machú, a woman who works there and documents all of the spontaneous theater shows. “No, we haven’t planned anything, but maybe you could talk to Argentina. She’s running the radio program right now since Leo is in Europe on the theater tour.”

Fanny, one of my the most expressive, lively actresses, happened to be there and listened in. She said hello to me with the typical kiss on the cheek and jokingly said, “Hi, Charlotte-I mean, Charleen!” because it took her a while to get my name right. We giggled, then she walked me over to the radio station, where I spoke with Argentina about my spontaneous question-turned-project.

“We don’t have anything planned to raise awareness, but street harassment happens every day, not just one week of the year. I can reserve a slot for you to come chat at 8 AM on Monday if you’d like. It would be good if you brought a friend who is from here.” I agreed that it would be important for a Nicaraguan woman to talk about it, so I called my friend Rosa right away. She agreed to send her daughter, Amy, whose quinceañera (15th birthday party) my mom and I attended last Christmas Eve.

Fanny’s son, Marlon, was also there, and I asked if he could come. He agreed because street harassment affects everyone, not just women. In November 2015, Gerardo Cruz was stabbed and killed in San José, Costa Rica after he caught a perverted man following a woman from behind and filming up her skirt. The video went viral, but he lost his life for speaking against street harassment.

Street harassment affects everyone. It’s so important to talk to boys as well as girls about actions that dismantle gender equity. These kinds of workshops will be done at Peace Corps Camp CHACA for boys in Nicaragua this July.

Street harassment also hurts economies. I often wonder how much more tourism dollars a country’s people could earn if women weren’t afraid of traveling because of feeling uncomfortable in public. I’ve decided against traveling down the street or to different countries because I don’t want to be hissed at or groped in public.

On Monday, I walked with Amy to The Collective. “Are you nervous to be on the radio?” I asked her. “No,” she said. “Well, I am! I’m glad you’re not nervous. What you’re doing is so important because many people don’t have a chance to share their opinions and to be heard. I’m nervous, but excited” I replied. I’d been on the radio before in Ecuador when I went with La Poderosa Media Project in 2011, but that time, I just spoke about who I was and where I was from. This time, it would be a more meaningful topic that I’d hoped would begin more much-needed conversations about unintentional (and intentional) gender oppression.

Amy and I got to the station and arrived before Argentina did. I don’t know about Amy, but I was squirming in my seat! In order to kill time, we chatted about her experiences with harassment.

Then, it was time to start once Argentina and Meyling arrived. We introduced ourselves and Argentina began the interview. She talked about how street harassment is becoming a more violent issue. The older men she’s talked to say that back in the day, they used to “seduce” women in the street by saying “sweet” things to them (las enamoraban), but never being disrespectful to them. Now, men are being more and more vulgar, forward, and disrespectful. With that background knowledge about the history of cat calling, we began.

Argentina (our host): How does street harassment make you feel?

Meyling: If you walk down into the city, and on the way down, you hear ten cat calls, then on the way back up, you’ll hear them ten times again. It’s exhausting for women to feel like they are constantly being objectified, or worse, groped. If men yell vulgarities at me, like “hey mamacita, you look delicious today,” then I tell them that what they’re doing is punishable by the Ley 779, and that I have the right to report them to the police. Once, a man in the street threatened to beat me up because I didn’t like him! He tried hugging me to feel my chest, but I had to use a self-defense move I learned in a jiu jitsu class on him.”

Meyling ended up thrusting her palm against his chin, causing him to fall back as she ran away.

Me: When men cat call me a “delicious white woman” in the street, I feel uncomfortable and objectified. I’m not a coconut popsicle! (The women in the room covered their mouths and laughed at this one) I’m not a food. I’m not an object. I’m a person. It’s interesting to point out that back in the day, men talking to women in the street was seen as a civilized, polite affair. Enamoraban a las mujeres (They seduced women).

“Enamorar” has the most positive connotation. Then, it was and is called “cat-calling”, or tirar piropos. We cannot see it as this innocent act any more. It’s violent, it’s unsolicited, and so we need to call it what it is: street harassment.

Amy explained that she’s experienced street harassment for as long as she could remember, and she brought up the important issue of child raising. By sharing her experience about her father trying to get her brother to talk to women as a boy, she made it clear that we need to think about how we raise our children. We need to teach our children how to be respectful to others.

Break time rolled along. My Nicaraguan counterpart teacher, Claudia, tapped on the door and came in a bit late because she’d gotten lost. Claudia and I are runners, so we both know what it’s like to have our workout routines disrupted by harassment. I was assaulted on a run last year because I wore headphones to avoid harassment, and my attacker thought I had a shiny iphone in my pocket, but I didn’t. I simply wore headphones to trick men into thinking I couldn’t hear them, but I still experienced physical violence. I’ve mostly recovered from it, as I ran a 10k later, but it’s undeniable that street harassment has shaped my experience here.

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“I’m #Wanderful because I still ran a 10K race after I was assaulted on a run last year.” April is sexual assault awareness month. Safety is such a huge issue for women, and I wanted to show how I bounced back from my assault on a run. It wasn't sexual, but it was still an assault. It wasn’t a perfect recovery, but I proved to myself that I won’t stop running. The 10K is organized every year in San Rafael del Norte, Nicaragua, and is dedicated to Odorico D’Andrea, a Catholic priest who passed away a long time ago, but he is still very much revered in the community. I ran the race last year, but this year it was a much more meaningful experience because I proved to myself that I wouldn’t let an assault prevent me from running. Last year, it was the first 10K I’d ever done. I saw it as a time to explore the northern area of Nicaragua while bonding with other volunteers. It was more of a diversion. I’d run a lot to prepare for it, and ran it in an hour. I got a 3rd place medal in the international women’s category (there weren’t very many of us there, but I still felt special). This year, I saw the race as a way to show myself and my attacker that I wouldn’t stop running. I was assaulted on a run on November 30th, 2015, and after that, I ran a lot less frequently. In order to prepare for the race, I ran 1-2 times a week, and did Insanity workouts indoors in order to train in a way that felt safe for me. I felt more safe than usual running in this race as opposed to in my city. There were lots of other people running with me, and people would step outside of their houses to watch me. Even then, I was still more on guard. When I felt someone running behind me, I was reminded of the way in which my attacker crept up behind me and tried stealing an iphone I didn’t have. Nothing happened to me during the race except for a muscle cramp while going uphill. After crossing the victory line, I did a victory dance to the cumbia music blasting from the oversized speakers. After I rubbed my legs with muscle ointment, a policeman fist bumped me. I’d proved it myself that I could do it.

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Claudia goes running at 5 AM to avoid the crowds. Once, on a run, a man began to take of his clothes and masturbated in front of her. She threatened to report him if he ever did that again, but the next day, she was too shaken up to go running.

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Claudia, my Nicaraguan counterpart teacher: "The truth is that I like to run in the mornings. Sometimes, as women, we have to dress uncomfortably since men in the streets sometimes say vulgar things to us. So, to avoid those kinds of “catcalls”, like they say, we cover ourselves up more so that they don’t tell us such vulgarities or look at us as if we were pieces of meat passing by.” Claudia joined me this morning to talk on Radio Vos' weekly radio show, "Ahora yo tengo la palabra" on 101.7, which runs every Monday at 8 AM. Today we talked about how and why to end street harassment. I know I've definitely kept from running sometimes to avoid harassment, but when I do go out, I experience it (no matter how baggy my clothes are). Have you ever decided to stay in because of #streetharassment?

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After Claudia shared, Argentina asked our listeners whether they thought cat-calls were innocent compliments or harassment. No one called in to participate, but oh well- the five of us had more than enough to say! We moved on to talking about how women dress. No matter how you dress, you’ll get attention. Harassers seem to think that women dress in order to please the men, not themselves.

“I’m a lesbian, so I’m not attracted to men,” I shared. “If I wear shorts it’s because it’s hot outside and I want to avoid sweating profusely (It’s always in the 80s and humid around here). I don’t wear shorts to please men.”

I almost didn’t come to Nicaragua because I was afraid of having to be in the closet, but here I was, coming out on the radio!

Before we knew it, it was 9 AM. We wrapped it up, and I gave a shout out to Amy’s mom, Rosa, for sending her brave daughter along to chat about street harassment. We’d all been pretty nervous to be on the air, but as the show progressed, we ended up laughing, giggling, and nodding our heads at one another.

We didn’t feel alone that morning, and I’m sure our listeners didn’t either. By having conversations like these about the misconceptions and effects of street harassment, maybe someday we’ll put an end to it.

Amy was such a boss that Argentina asked for her contact info to come back for another show!

Have you experienced street harassment? If not, do you know someone who has? How has it affected you or them?

When I Was Assaulted Abroad, Here Are the Steps Steps I Took to Heal Myself

Trigger Warning: Assault

As non-male travelers, we live uniquely gendered experiences. No matter where we are, women’s safety is an ever-relevant topic. Thanks to technology, we are more connected to information about traveling to different parts of the world.

From deciding to go to Israel to attending protests abroad, safety matters to all of us. But how do we prevent or avoid smaller, more targeted crimes, like assault or petty thefts?

I had never been assaulted until I came to Nicaragua, the safest country in Central America.

I have traveled to several different countries and put myself in much riskier situations, so I did not expect to be assaulted at knife point in the morning as I ran up the huge hill.

I was wearing headphones, as I do on my typical morning runs, but I had no electronics with me. I wear headphones to avoid catcalls, so men will think I can’t hear their sexual and lewd comments.

Read what happened in November and what I’ve done to recover on my latest Wanderful post.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness month, and April 10-16 is International Anti-Street Harassment week.

3 Lessons Girls Taught Me About Empowering Them

3 Lessons Girls Taught Me About Empowering Them

The girls of Camp GLOW (Girls leading our world) had such insightful questions, and while few things teenagers ask ever surprise me, I was shocked by this question:

How can I reduce machismo and feminismo(feminism)?

The girl who posed the question viewed feminismo (feminism) as equally oppressive asmachismo, which refers to the patriarchal forces in Latin America.

Machismo reinforces heteronormative gender expectations of men and women: Men are breadwinners, while women should take care of the home. At its most non-violent, machismo reinforces rigid gender roles. At its most violent, machismo normalizes violence against women.The Gender Index found that 70% of Nicaraguan women have experienced some form of violence. Rapes and femicides make the nightly news regularly.

I knew that machismo was a societal problem, but I didn’t expect feminism to have a bad wrap at a girls’ camp. The girls taught me to ask them what they wanted to know. If I hadn’t done that, I wouldn’t have thought to address this misconception.

Find out the misconceptions we cleared up about feminism, and the three lessons girls taught me about empowerment in my Wanderful post!

Camp GLOW 2016: Learning about LGBTQ Identity

Camp GLOW 2016: Learning about LGBTQ Identity

Just when I thought the girls were too shy or tired to ask us questions during an LGBTQ workshop, one of them piped up: “So, we can ask anything?” My most memorable part of Camp GLOW for Nicaraguan girls, and of 2016, was when the girls asked me about my experience as a queer woman. The girls asked me very personal questions, including:

Q. How old were you when you realized you were gay?

Q. What was your first relationship with a woman like?

Q. What’s been the hardest part of being gay for you?

Q. How did your friends react when you were gay?

Read about how I came out to 53 girls at our LGBTQ Identity workshop during the five day girls’ camp.

Camp GLOW 2016: What Do Nicaraguan Girls Want to Learn?

Camp GLOW 2016: What Do Nicaraguan Girls Want to Learn?

We offered 9 Gender Empowerment workshops at Camp GLOW for Nicaraguan girls, and we wanted to know what the girls wanted to learn before we assumed anything. Here are just a few of the insightful, surprising questions they asked.

How can I reduce “machismo” and “feminismo” in society?

Is one’s self esteem related to their sexuality?

Why do some people still feel empty inside after reaching their goals?

Read my second Gender and Development Committee entry to find out what the girls wanted to get out of the camp!